Ratchets

Sturtevant Richmont offers different ratchets to meet the needs of different industries. In addition to the normal industrial assembly, tool ratchets we also offer "Hold and Drive" ratchets for aerospace. 

Scrolling down this page provides you with a good look at our ratchets. Even the world's best ratchets wear out, and at the bottom of the page, you will find the ratchet renewal kits. 

All of our ratchets maintain our common centerlines

Fine Tooth Ratchets - NEW!

When our customers said they needed to get more swing arc in ratcheting applications, we listened. We created a ratchet with more teeth, More teeth on drive gear means you are able to able to swing the wrench in tighter areas and grab the next tooth on the drive gear. We designed this ratchet for all the tight places that our customers wanted to access, but couldn't with our ratchets with fewer teeth. 

The Fine Tooth Ratchets  adhere to the 1 7/16"  Inch Common Centerline                      SDRT

36.5 mm Common Centerline

Part Number Model Designation Square Drive Size Torque Rating A (Inches) B (Inches) C (Inches) D (Inches) E (Inches)
819340 SDRF 3/8 3/8" 960 Inch-Lbs  2.47   1.20  1.01  1.00  0.75
819341 SDRF 1/4 1/4" 250 Inch-Lbs 2.32  0.90  0.75  0.88   0.69
Dimensions refer to the drawing above.

Finetooth Ratchets

Fine Tooth RatchetThe Finethooth Ratchet is the latest in the Sturtevant Richmont ratchet family. From the first glance at this ratchet, you'll immediately notice the differences. The differences can be found in more than the looks. 

People love the durability they experience using our ratchets. But for every strength, there can be a trade-off. We found a way to eliminate the trade-off so you get the legendary durability from our Finetooth Ratchet and you get an improved swing arc. 

The number of teeth on the ratchet drive gear determines the swing arc needed for the ratchet to grab the next tooth and move the drive gear. If a drive gear has 20 teeth, the wrench must swing 18 degrees in order to grab the next tooth. With 40 teeth, the wrench must swing 9 degrees to grab the next tooth and move the drive gear. With our new Finetooth Ratchet, the swing arc is less than 5 degrees. Combine the smaller body with the shorter swing arc and you can use this ratchet in places that you couldn't use our other ratchets. 

The profile and shape are different than our other ratchets. You'll also notice that rather than the slide pin on all of our other ratchets, we used the exposed reversing lever on the back of the ratchet. 

While the swing arc is shorter, the durability is the same as our other ratchets. Why? Typically the point of failure is the square drive, not the teeth. The square drive failure is determined by metal quality, not the tooth count. Like all of our other ratchets, we use high-quality metal components to make the drive gear and square drive.   

NEW! SDRF Hold and Drive Ratchets Are Here!

If you are in the Aerospace industry, you are well familiar with the hold-and-drive ratchets. Customers asked us to make a hold-and-drive version of our fine tooth ratchet. We've been listening to our customers for more than 90 years, so of course, we created the SDRF Hold and Drive Ratchet. Each model has a 1/8" hole drilled through the square drive. 

Because of the drive sizes, drilling the hold eliminated the spring-loaded ball detent. 

Part Number

Model

Square Drive Size

Torque Rating

A (Inches) B (Inches) C (Inches) D (Inches) E (Inches)
819342 3/8" SDRF with 1/8th Inch Hole 3/8"

960 Inch Lbs

2.47"

1.20" 1.01" 1.00" 0.75"
819343 1/4" SDRF with 1/8th Inch Hole 1/4" 250 Inch Lbs. 2.32" 0.9" 0.75" 0.88" 0.68"

This is the same great fine-tooth ratchet that we added to our lineup in 2021. We've just added the hole through the square drive. 

 

Here we are having a little fun with the new ratchets:

Ordering Information and Specifications SDRT Ratchets

For decades, the SDRT Ratchets have been the backbone of the Sturtevant Richmont ratchet offering. These ratchets are strong, durable, and they get the job done all over the world. 

 

Dimensions refer to the illustrated key.     SDRT

1 7/16"  Inch Common Centerline                  36.5 mm Common Centerline                                                  

 

Part NumberModel DesignationSquare  Drive Size (in.)Fatigue Torque Rating (in-lb)A (inches)B (inches)C (inches)D (inches)E (inches)
809504 SDRT - 1/4 1/4 250 1 7/8  1 3/8 15/16 3/4 5/8
809505 SDRT - 3/8 3/8 1250 1 1/2 1 1/4 1 9/16
809506 SDRT - 1/2 1/2 2500 2 1/2 1 3/4 1 1/4 1 1/4 3/4

3 7/8"  Common Centerline       98.4 mm Common Centerline

Part NumberModel DesignationSquare Drive Size (in.)Torque Rating (in-lb)A (inches)B (inches)C (inches)D (inches)E (inches)
809507 SDRT - 3/4 3/4 4800 5  47/64 2 11/16 1 63/64 1 1/2 1

 

Hold and Drive Ratchets

Aerospace assemblies sometimes use a special fastener to ensure there are no gaps between surfaces. 

Sturtevant Richmont creates these ratchets using our existing designs. Holes are precision drilled to ensure flawless use while maintaining structural integrity.

Plus you get the benefit of placing this head at the end of many different Sturtevant Richmont torque wrenches. Like all of our heads, our ratchets maintain the common centerline. 

Hold and Drive Ratchets

Hold and Drive Ordering Information

Part Number Model  Designation Drive Size  (in.) Hole Size  (in.) Hex Key Size
853246  SDRT 3/8 DH156 3/8 5/32  1/8 or 3 mm
853364  SDRT 1/2  DH156 1/2 5/32  1/8 or 3 mm
853590  SDRT 1/4 DH140 1/4 9/64  1/8 or 3 mm
853619  SDRT 1/4 DH125 1/4 1/8  3/32  or 2mm 
853656  SDRT 3/8 DH125 3/8 1/8  3/32  or 2mm 

Hold and Drive Ratchets maintain identical dimensions to their standard ratchet counterpart size. 

Understanding the Hold and Drive ratchet designation. The fraction listed after SDRT is the drive size. DH156 represents the decimal equivalent of the 5/32" hole that is drilled into the spindle.  DH140 represents the decimal equivalent of the 9/64 hole that is drilled in the spindle. DH125 represents the decimal equivalent of the 1/8" hole that is drilled in the spindle. 

All ratchets wear out with use. We have ratchet renewal kits that are quick and easy to install. Be sure to lubricate the ratchet renewal kit if you want to maximize ratchet durability. 

 

Socket Lock Pin

When you need additional security with impact sockets ensuring a socket stays on a wrench, the Socket Lock Pin series provides a solid solution. 

Engineered for strength and built for durability. 

Part Number Model Designation Drive  Size
853304 SLRP 1/4 SOC LOCK PIN 1/4 inch
853305 SLRP 3/8 SOC LOCK PIN 3/8 inch
853548 SLRP 1/2 SOC LOCK PIN 1/2 inch

Small Ratchet Body With  Larger Drive Size

These interchangeable head ratchets provide more power in small places. You get the access of a smaller ratchet body with the power of a larger square drive. 

Dimensions for these ratchets can be found looking at the comparable body size standard ratchet. 

Part NumberDescriptionCapacity
853752 SBR 1/4" body with 3/8" Square Drive 250 in-lbs
853395 SBR 3/8" body with 1/2" Square Drive 1250 in-lbs
809508 SBR 1/2" body with 3/4" Square Drive 2500 in-lbs

 These are ideal when you need a larger drive square in a smaller ratchet body. If you need a small body and a smaller swing arc, look at the Finetooth Ratchet Series. 

 

Ratchet Renewal Kit

Ratchet Renewal KitSooner or later even the best tools wear out. We created the Ratchet Renewal Kit for those times when your ratchet doesn't quite work as smoothly as it once did.

Ratchet Renewal Kits range in size from 1/4 inch drive up to 3/4 inch drive. It is important to order the size that corresponds to the one you are replacing. Kit part numbers are assigned by spindle size. In addition to a new spindle, the kit includes a reversing pin, washer, retaining ring, spring, and ball. 

IMPORTANT: When replacing any part of a ratchet, all parts of the ratchet renewal kit MUST be used. While the parts may look OK to the eye, don't be tempted to take the shortcut. 

IMPORTANT: When you are installing the ratchet renewal kit, be sure to lubricate the internal parts. Without lubrication, the ratchet teeth, and the slide pin would engage in unprotected metal to metal contact. When properly lubricated, these pieces are highly durable. When they are not properly lubricated, they literally tear each other apart. In non-functioning ratchets that have been returned to us after the owners installed the ratchet renewal kits without lubrication, we could see metal shavings inside the ratchet. Failure to lubricate will shorten the useful life of the ratchet. 

Tools required to install a new Ratchet Renewal Kit include:

  • Snap ring pliers
  • Small flat-head screwdriver
  • Tweezers
  • Molybdenum Disulfide
  • Vice or stand

 

Ordering Information for Ratchet Renewal Kits for Ratcheting Wrenches and SDRT Heads. 

Part Number Model Designation Use With Ratchet
816998  1/4" Ratchet Renewal Kit 809504
816958  3/8" Ratchet Renewal Kit 809505
816956  1/2" Ratchet Renewal Kit 809506
816999  3/4" Ratchet Renewal Kit 809507
816959 3/8" Spindle With 1/2" Drive Renewal Kit 853395
816957 1/2" Spindle With 3/4" Drive Renewal Kit 809508
816997 Double 3/4" Square Drive Renewal Kit *See Note Below

 *The Double 3/4" Square Drive ratchet head fits on these three products: 853400 (custom-built tool) as well as the 830081 and 830082-micrometer adjustable wrenches. 

Need a ratchet renewal kit for other ratchets that we produce?

 

Why Ratchet Tooth Count Matters

The drive gear on the spindle is the heart of a ratchet. The number of teeth on the drive gear determines to how far you need to swing the handle in order to engage the next tooth. 

Drive gears come with a variety of tooth sizes and tooth counts. There are coarse ratchets which means the drive gear has 20 to 40 teeth. With a circle being 360 degrees, a 20 tooth ratchet means you’ll have to swing the wrench handle 18 degrees in order to engage the next tooth. If a drive gear has 40 teeth, you’ll need to swing that handle 9 degrees. 

Fine tooth ratchets range from 72 to 160 teeth. With 160 teeth on your drive gear, you’ll only need to swing the handle 2.25 degrees in order to engage the next tooth. Small teeth take a big bite out of swing room. 

It is usually the spindle or square drive that breaks or shears when the torque capacity has been reached. So the drive size drives torque capacity. 

It is easy to be tempted into thinking that smaller teeth mean lower torque capacity. Overall, torque capacity is driven by the quality of the drive size. Low-quality metal will break or shear long before high-quality steel does, regardless of tooth count. If you are misusing a ratchet made from high-quality metal, it will break just like any other that is misused. 

Do some ratchets experience gear failures rather than drive failure? Of course, but it does not happen as frequently. 

 

Need Assistance?  Worldwide call  +1-847-455-8677 

 

 

 Sturtevant Richmont tools are proudly made in Carol Stream, Illinois by highly capable hands.